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Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:

 
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Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
In the interest of preparedness concerning the cities along the East coast should a Megatsunami actually occur from a LaPalma landslide, where would be some the best places to go to get to high ground in a timely manner.
Here's a compilation of member comments. Collected member comments and organized by coastal state suggested information regarding preferential routes, high ground places to go and tips for traveling routes. These are some ideas and suggestions from other GLP members who are giving thought and planning evac and may help others when planning same.
All coastal states listed. If blank, there were no comments provided for that area as yet.
Note that there are some member travel tips at the bottom.

Hopefully, this list will never be needed.

AL:
In Alabama, considering the coastal areas which lie at a range of around 10-30 feet above sea level and Mobile Bay and delta areas, which are pretty low lying land areas, I’d say if it were possible, try to get to Mt. Cheaha area. It’s about 4-5 hours north of the Gulf Coast area and is around 1200-1500 feet above sea level.
You may not have to drive that far, to get to higher ground, but you’d need to take into consideration all of the rivers in your area and try to get away from those.

If anyone else from Alabama can chime in and give a closer point to get to than Cheaha, that would be great!
I agree with you, it depends on personal tolerance for risk. Dothan has the nuclear power plant, why I didn't include it. Birmingham is plenty safe.

By even the scariest estimates, Mt. Cheaha should be fine. Personally, I think Dothan, or even Atmore, would be far enough inland. I would be heading for Birmingham, elevation about 650 feet.

Pine Mountain near Columbus Ga is 1395 feet. The area is around 922 feet. Or go up 441 to the Appalachians.

Head North and West, maybe to the NW part of the state. Get away from the Mississippi River and the smaller rivers on the Northshore. No one knows how this would affect the Mississippi River, but I have a bad feeling about that.

Alabama has hills in many places going from the middle of the state to the north, so Cheaha is not the only high place they can get to. They start getting higher the more north you go, though most of the hills are high enough to for a 30 ft or somewhat higher tsunami.

CT:
I used to live in CT def stay out of New London and rotten Groton. You’ve got the Thames running by the EB (electric boat) plant and the Naval Sub base home to the USS Dallas (or at least it was when I lived there). Not sure what type of Tsunami wave would hit this area I.e. at what magnitude/force but we house nuclear submarine force here and there are usually a couple at sea, one at dock and one or two in dry dock. DISCLAIMER…FYI this is easily found info so I am not spreading top secret info here…coast down the river and you can see for yourself it’s in public view depending on your location.

I would think you would need to go inland toward Hartford to escape a massive tsunami and even then you might need to go further. If memory serves Hartford was about 40-45 min from my place in New London. It’s been a minute though and two kids so lots of burned brain cells…my calculations might be off lol.

DE:
Drive to Lancaster PA or on to Harrisburg if in DE
Those in Lower Slower Delaware will have to drive up the peninsula first.

FL:
Where ever you are, you want to go North and West out of the State. You can cut across the State to the W. Coast very easily on backroads and then head North. Again, look for back roads. From the east coast, you COULD take 95-N, but it follows the entire Eastern coastline. That’s why your first immediate course of action will be to head West first.

You need to be ready for now panicking aggressive drivers and chaos once it all goes mainstream. 20 million people in this State. Early response and speed of reaction to the Event will save your life. Make sure you are armed, but don’t be paranoid, don’t cause any trouble or start any problems- just stay “switched on” and be on guard. Keep your personal space safe. People turn into animals when they are subject to fear or chaos, oftentimes resorting to violence for any number of reasons. Look to pre-landfall Hurricane behavior for an example…fighting in stores, robberies, thefts, driving recklessly, etc. This is the one time in my life where I will advocate speeding, but not beyond your capabilities to react suddenly. All eyes in the vehicle need to be either on the Road watching for hazards, clearing lanes for you to pass or using a mobile device to run reconnaissance on traffic ahead as well as plotting course while the GPS still works.


From southern part of the state (south of Lake Okeechobee), Keys or Miami, I would get on 595/Alligator Alley (also called Tamiami Trail) and go north. This will take you west (yes, it says north, but it means east/west (cray/cray!). I-595, etc. Once you get to the middle of the state (Hwy 27 or 29 or 31 - depending on where you are (these are mostly out of Broward Cty and Hendry),you can take any of those north. They are back roads, but mostly 4 lanes and not terribly crowded. Most people opt to stay on 595 and go up 95 (east coast) or 75 (west coast). But by taking one of these, you are in the middle of the state. 441 or 98 out of Okeechobee will also take you north.

Then, depending on where you find yourself, you can go west on 80, 70, or 60. 98 or 301 are also north of Lakeland, and good roads to go north AND west. You'll have to look on a map to see where they connect. They are all Fairly good roads, but not interstate. By this time, you are well north of the lake, heading toward the northern half of the state and the elevation of the land begins to rise.

If you're leaving from the West coast, like Naples/Ft. Myers/Tampa area - you might have to travel up 75 for a bit. GOOD LUCK getting out of Tampa in any kind of hurry. You'll definitely want to be the FIRST to get out of Tampa, as it doens't take any time at all to bottle-neck on 75 there, and other than surface roads, like Dale Mabry, there aren't many good north/south roads that go very far. Once you get north of - say Ocala - 301 is a good bet, but a really rural road, and lots of stop lights, so take that into consideration with your driving time, stopping/gas breaks, etc.

You need to be one of the FIRST to hit the roads once that thing busts loose.
If you've lived anywhere in FL for any length of time, you already know which times of day, or days of the week, or near certain cities, and how long it would take to get out of the state, so I would (mostly) go with that type of information to make plans.

Back roads are good rather than Interstates, but interstates are certainly faster. So, my plan would be to use the interstate until I see too many panicked people jumping onto it. Hopefully, I would be very close to where I want to be before that would happen.

If I still lived in Florida I would be thinking of the top level of universal studios parking deck. Debris would be a concern but water would flow though. Might be stuck up there a while until search and rescue sends a chopper.

Florida peninsula.

If you aren't leaving well in advance, forget about trying to drive out of the danger zone. Find a building that is at least 4-5 stories tall and know how to reach the top floors or roof, but not one on either coast! A parking garage in Orlando or Ocala is probably a good bet.

Find a building that has plenty of other buildings surrounding it so those will take the brunt of the water and debris that will come with the water. Make sure it is a stable building and won't have its foundation washed out easily. This is another reason you DO NOT want to be in a high-rise-type building at the beach.

GA:

I live in SE GA close to the FL border. My plan is to head NW to Waycross, then toward Macon of needed.

Just a head’s up, if you tour the Indian Mounds at the National Monument in Macon, GA; they reference the wholesale abandonment at the site around 1100AD DNA evidence points to the descendants of those who evacuated Mid-Georgia from that flood, were found to have gone all the way to Southern Illinois! If you’re gonna run, let this be a lesson to you…it best be far.

LA/MS:

Head North and West, maybe to the NW part of the state. Get away from the Mississippi River and the smaller rivers on the Northshore. No one knows how this would affect the Mississippi River, but I have a bad feeling about that.

Evacuating south Louisiana has historically proven to be a very difficult task due to stubborn citizens and slow-moving government officials.
Lake Pontchartrain gets surges from hurricane waters, and would most likely be affected by tsunami waters as well.

Jackson, MS, should be safe.

MA:
Most of the North shore will be underwater, get outside the 95 corridor and its better. The northern part of the north shore needs to be aware of Seabrook Nuclear plant as well.
South shore get much much much farther away. When the lovely diversity cities get hit, or find out that others have been expect looting. (I don't know South shore Geography, I'm from Saugus)
Cape should be completely evacuated, I don't know if that would be possible. This may be one of those a boat is your best bet situation. Go far far far out to sea to avoid the wave.

I'm north shore MA, about a mile from the ocean. I'm thinking I would head to Mount Wachusett. It would take a little over an hour to get there.


ME:
I’m on the coast. 10 miles from the sea, but 1 mile from a river that meets the sea.
I don’t have much advice except to get off the coastal Route 1, and head inland.

York and within 10 miles of 95 on either side need to head north and west.
Until you get north of Portland 95 is underwater at various points so you will have to get either north of Gray on 95 or take rural routes.
Most of southern Maine is within the zone of Seabrook Nuclear power plant and needs to evacuate.
Costal areas should all go west. Go further than you think safe since with the amount of rivers and the way the coast is laid out waves may gain height from our unique geography.

Most of the North shore will be underwater, get outside the 95 corridor and its better. The northern part of the north shore needs to be aware of Seabrook Nuclear plant as well.
South shore get much much much farther away. When the lovely diversity cities get hit, or find out that others have been expect looting. (I don't know South shore Geography, I'm from Saugus)
Cape should be completely evacuated, I don't know if that would be possible. This may be one of those a boat is your best bet situation. Go far far far out to sea to avoid the wave.

In southern Maine you need to be aware of the Seabrook nuclear power plant. If south of Portland that needs to factor in as well.
We're in Maine, in the triangle between LA, Augusta, Farmington, so we should be safe from this.
My In-laws are in Biddeford, near the Saco line/ river, so I'm going to need to get them out of there. Ditto with the Sister in law, nephew, and her fiance.

Depending on the weather if the Nuclear plant goes down which would in this situation be likely due to where it is, the effects could roll up the coast with the weather.

MD:
If on the Chesapeake region in Maryland you need to high tail north west to at least Fredrick, MD.

For Wash, DC - see below

NC:
BEFORE official EBS alerts go off need to hightail it inland via major traffic corridors before they become parking lots. Goal is to get west of I-95.
hurricane evac plans of reversing all major traffic corridors (like I-40, 795 64/264).
Both Carolinas are problematic due to low country, so many waterways emptying out into ocean. Depending on size of wave and amount of water being pushed, NC's OBX will be like front tackle line but then energy of water moves across the big Albemarle Sound and pushes up all rivers, creeks, etc.

Folks inland living on/near waterways need to factor in rising water and the backwash of debris once water reverses proper course to empty back down east.

NH:
Get to the west of the state, Get to 93 if possible and stay away/ get away from the 95 area as much as possible.
Seabrook Nuclear is only a few feet above sea level. That knocks out an area from just south of Portland Maine, all the way down towards Boston.

NJ:
Just take one of the many roads West toward PA.(195-95-PA turnpike route). Aside from NW Jersey where there are mountains, there's really no other option but to haul ass into PA.

In NJ, the safe counties would be Morris and Sussex in the northwest corner. (30 miles west off the GWB)
If you go into PA, stay away from the Delaware River because the water will come up it.
Keep an eye on traffic patterns. If I get the sense that the general population is starting to flee, I'll stop short of approaching the Delaware because getting stuck in a bottleneck (The Delaware Water Gap) there would be very bad.

Note: poster is on this thread if you wish to question this counter-advice further;
NJ here. Bad advice if you are at least 20 miles inland. Stay home with maximum preps, don't end up a refugee in a FEMA camp.

The tsunami size is being greatly exaggerated. Maximum 80 feet but probably 40 is accurate. Penetration 4 to 6 miles, 10 at worst. Most fringe scenario 20 miles.

If you are 20 miles in, the greatest danger is hordes of displaced people. Do not be one of them.

95 Bridge to PA crosses below Trenton. Bad bad move. The Deleware is tidal all the way to Trenton marsh. Floods occur on the PA side usually, NJ is a high bluff mostly. You do not want to be on the roads in PA near there.

If you are really freaking out in S Jersey, look up Arneys Mt. It's really a hill, but over 200 feet.

I live in North East New Jersey. Not all the way up in the corner, but in Essex County (Newark and east of there along Bloomfield Ave. I am essentially in the center of Montclair. We are 120'-200' above sea level. However, the next ridge up (Eagle Rock Reservation, Verona, Pompton Ave) are 450'+. The view at Eagle Rock is 500'. If this is the real big one (some videos suggest could be well over 200') then Eagle Rock is our escape location.

NY:
There's the Pocono Mts (Seems a good choice with major hwy to get to it. See NJ for further info), Catskills(seems too close to coast) and Adirondacks (seems too far to try to get to)

I think if I were in NY, the Catskills would be the best option. Closer than the Poconos. Op means well, but isn't an expert. If the Catskills get wiped out by a tsunami, we're all pretty much fucked anyways.

Lake Erie's (the lake upstream from Niagara Falls) elevation is 570' ABOVE sea level

... for a tsunami to get to OVER Niagara Falls and get into Lake Erie the tsunami would have to come in nearly 700 miles from the Atlantic Ocean to Montreal via the St. Lawrance River, then climb up a couple of hundred feet into Lake Ontario, go across Lake Ontario (another 190 miles) and then go up and over the Niagara Escarment another 300+ feet in elevation in order to reach Lake Erie.

OR

The main alternative way would be for it to come UP the Mississippi and then cross the farm fields of Indianna, crossing a ridge that is at about 650' above sea level so as to get into Lake Erie near Toledo, a trip of nearly 1000 miles inland

OR the third way:

To come up the Mississippi River and Illinois River, then crossing a ridge just South of Chicago that is at about 600' above sea level and flow into Lake Michigan with the water then coming down the lakes past Detoit so as to reach Lake Erie. A trip of nearly 800 miles inland from New Orleans

IF there is a wave that is high enough to do any of those tasks I am not sure you want to survive into the post wave chaos anyway. Life as we know it will be over with ... and there will be multiple Fukushimas all over the world to make life miserable for the next 10,000 years.

PA:
Route 611 in eastern Pennsylvania rides the delaware river. Stay out of that area of travel. Easton PA floods often.
Note: the PA turnpike loosely follows the Appalachian Trail. Means one can leave the TP on foot and haul ass. fThe Appalachian Trail does not follow the PA turnpike, not even remotely close. The Appalachian Trail runs NE to SW and the PA turnpike runs E-W. There's only ONE point where the two are close and that's where they intersect.

Appalachian Trail (appalachiantrail.org) which is a very high elevation, but does not follow the turnpike. I know there's a hill just north of Lancaster/Manheim area that is 1,125 feet above sea level. Where as the TP near Manheim is about 500 feet above.

PA here. Route 80 through the Delaware Water Gap is a bottleneck that will flood. If you can go to northwest NJ and cross into the Poconos up north by Matamoras, that would be better. Anywhere south of the big mountain ridge we call Bangor Mountain around here is going to be flooded. You have to head north of 80. The Appalachian Trail follows on top of the Bangor Mountain ridge. It crosses 80 at the Delaware Water Gap, but that's a bad place to get stuck.

(paturnpike.com)
PA turnpike is low all the way to the west of Harrisburg. Be better to go up 81 either into NY or to 80 to go west in PA.

For Lancaster, the Mt. Gretna area is 1,050ft average. Just North of Manheim going to Lebanon.

RI:

SC:
Pulled out my atlas and here's what folks down in SC (and the residents of Savannah) can go w/ for evac info.
Most important thing is steer clear from the lakes close in and the rivers/waterways. Instant flooding in a second.
Goal is to get west of I-95. North Myrtle/Myrtle Beach communites go west on Hwy 9, 501, 378. Georgetown communites go west on Hwy. 521. Charleston, surrounding islands and Tri-County communities have Hwy 176 adn 78 running parallel to I-26. Also Hwy 52 going north to Florence. Beaufort, Hilton Head and other islands and Savannah are the closet to I-95 and need to go north on Hwys 321, 278.
When EAS/EBS goes out, officials would revert to hurricane evac procedures, reversing I-26 and only having parallel country hwys/roads w/ normal traffic patterns.
***I-95 runs just a few miles inland on the southern tip of SC/northen tip of GA. This part of I-95, major N/S corridor will be impacted and depending on severity of damage of tsunami wave(s), as well as damage from backwash of debris to the ocean, this is a choke point for our truckers.

TX:
If you are on Galveston Island, cross the causeway, take HWY 6 north, exit is very soon after crossing the bridge. This is to avoid Houston. If word gets out, Houston will be hell. Houston is hell during normal times.

VA:
For Wash, DC - see below

VT:

Washington, D.C.:

Lk Michigan in Hammond, IN: (Comment from an inland member)
I live about 4 miles from the southern tip of Lake Michigan In Hammond, Indiana. I do believe the water will rise, but will mostly affect the ones closer to the lake. I am at 613ft here.
That said, the original southern tip of Lake Michigan went all the way to U.S. 30, many thousands of years ago, and was at Ridge Road(Route 6)about 10,000 years ago. When the first settlers came here, a lot of the area up to Ridge Road(Route 6) was swamp, and it was drained by a series of ditches. I am in the southeast section of the city now, but I had my first home in the north section. A dog I had back then, dug a hole in the yard, and uncovered sand filled with clam and snail shells from when the Lake covered the area a long time ago.
If and when La Palma goes, I am 5 minutes away from Ridge Road(route 6), which was the line for the lake about 10,000 years ago, and 25 minutes away from Route 30. I would definitely try to make it to just south of Route 30, which would be a safer area as it is about 100ft higher than where I am at now.
IMO, find out where the original lake shoreline was in your area, and go to a point past that.

Flooding in Lake Michigan? Wouldn't that mean Niagara has to flow backwards? I don't see that happening but if so, kiss 60% of Canada's population goodbye.


Here is flood map and elevation finder tools:
[link to www.floodmap.net (secure)]
[link to www.freemaptools.com (secure)]

Here is a topographic map to see where you are and where is the closest high ground:
[link to en-us.topographic-map.com (secure)]

Also, have or print out paper maps. Keep your gas tank topped off.

[link to tsunami.gov (secure)] (For what it may be worth. A lot of info is listed.)

How Far Inland Can A Tsunami Travel On The East Coast USA?
[link to modernsurvivalblog.com (secure)]

COMMENT TIPS:
A reminder that if you live in a place at risk and have an RV you are putting away for the winter ... consider putting it into storage at a location where you would be bugging out to (up high though, NO river valleys) even it that is 200 or 400 miles away.
It has to be sitting somewhere all winter anywhere so the time to move it to where you might go is just an "insurance policy" for you and your family if things do go south.

Perhaps inland people near rivers need to consider what will happen to those rivers when they cannot empty into the ocean as usual because the wave/water is blocking their exit. It would likely take a few days for the tsunami water to receed enough so that all the rivers that empty into the sea can start flowing properly again. If I lived near any river that empties into the sea in the predicted tsunami impact zone I'd be prepared to see flooding.

Just calling attention to something EVERYONE is overlooking. Inland river flooding.
When rivers that flow into the ocean, such as the MISSISSIPPI where will all that water go when it can't empty as usual into the ocean, where will the water go?
Anyone living in an inland river network must be aware of flooding. It won't resolve until the tsunami waters subside and can flow into the ocean again.
This means any river that empties INTO the MISSISSIPPI...(as an example). People along areas that empty into the St. Lawrence...another example. Water will not be able to move as normal until the tsunami waters subside.
Don't ignore this aspect...dear evacuees...you may be jumping from the frying pan into the fire if you fail to consider this.
I will repeat. ANY Tributary such as the Ohio river, that feeds into the Mississippi river which empties into the Gulf will experience flooding when the Mississippi cannot empty into the Gulf. Any creeks that empty into the Ohio which empties into the Mississippi will also experience flooding.
Thus all inland people who live in areas where a tributary empties into an ocean-bound river must be prepared for flooding. The tsunami water does not recede overnight. It takes days. Each of those days is another day of "backed up water" that cannot exit the system. This puts pressure on local dams and public water systems.

One last tip; might want to add 1 or 2 of your closest into speed dial so not have to look up name nor dial the number and also pre-type a text message in case cannot reach by phone.

Rule: Don't be scared. Be Prepared.

Last Edited by I_Object! on 11/18/2021 05:10 PM
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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
bump
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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
Main thread for the La Palma volcano:

Thread: Cumbre Vieja volcano ongoing eruption! Intense quake swarm under the Ridge !pg 1963

Last Edited by I_Object! on 10/03/2021 02:53 PM
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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
OP. Great job! Love the work your doing here
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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
I live in SE GA close to the FL border. My plan is to head NW to Waycross, then toward Macon of needed.
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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
Great info!
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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
Great thread.

Actual usable info for US citizens. Will send to relatives on the E coast(who are paying no attention whatsoever).
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Nice research and summary post, OP. Five stars & green for you!
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Thx for making this a separate thread, OP.

Folks gonna' need it, I fear. Hoping for slow crumbling and no waves but kind of doubtful looking at it now.
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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
NJ here. Bad advice if you are at least 20 miles inland. Stay home with maximum preps, don't end up a refugee in a FEMA camp.

The tsunami size is being greatly exaggerated. Maximum 80 feet but probably 40 is accurate. Penetration 4 to 6 miles, 10 at worst. Most fringe scenario 20 miles.

If you are 20 miles in, the greatest danger is hordes of displaced people. Do not be one of them.

95 Bridge to PA crosses below Trenton. Bad bad move. The Deleware is tidal all the way to Trenton marsh. Floods occur on the PA side usually, NJ is a high bluff mostly. You do not want to be on the roads in PA near there.

If you are really freaking out in S Jersey, look up Arneys Mt. It's really a hill, but over 200 feet.
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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
How about just top floors of tall buildings?

Would that work? Would the water knock them down?

in NYC theres plenty in case you cant get out in time.

Last Edited by trthskr on 10/03/2021 03:34 PM
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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
Thank you for this. When the smoke and ash become so thick as to prevent air travel, this could be the only resource people have.
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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
In the interest of preparedness concerning the cities along the East coast should a Megatsunami actually occur from a LaPalma landslide, where would be some the best places to go to get to high ground in a timely manner.
Here's a compilation of member comments taken from the main Cumbre Vieja volcano thread. I sorted member comments and organized by coastal state information regarding preferential routes, high ground places to go and tips for traveling routes. All coastal states listed. If blank, there were no comments provided for that area.

Hopefully, this list will never be needed.

AL:
In Alabama, considering the coastal areas which lie at a range of around 10-30 feet above sea level and Mobile Bay and delta areas, which are pretty low lying land areas, I’d say if it were possible, try to get to Mt. Cheaha area. It’s about 4-5 hours north of the Gulf Coast area and is around 1200-1500 feet above sea level.
You may not have to drive that far, to get to higher ground, but you’d need to take into consideration all of the rivers in your area and try to get away from those.

If anyone else from Alabama can chime in and give a closer point to get to than Cheaha, that would be great!
I agree with you, it depends on personal tolerance for risk. Dothan has the nuclear power plant, why I didn't include it. Birmingham is plenty safe.

By even the scariest estimates, Mt. Cheaha should be fine. Personally, I think Dothan, or even Atmore, would be far enough inland. I would be heading for Birmingham, elevation about 650 feet.

Pine Mountain near Columbus Ga is 1395 feet. The area is around 922 feet. Or go up 441 to the Appalachians.

Head North and West, maybe to the NW part of the state. Get away from the Mississippi River and the smaller rivers on the Northshore. No one knows how this would affect the Mississippi River, but I have a bad feeling about that.

CT:

DE:
Drive to Lancaster PA or on to Harrisburg if in DE
Those in Lower Slower Delaware will have to drive up the peninsula first.

FL:
NW out of the State. Can cut across the State to the W. Coast very easily and take backroads heading North once gridlock happens. You COULD take 95-N, but it follows the entire Eastern coastline. What if gridlock occurs before you can exit and head West? That’s why my immediate course of action will be to head West first. You need to evacuate the State and assess from somewhere that you KNOW will be safe, like Eastern TN or Western NC. You need to be ready for now panicking aggressive drivers and chaos once it all goes mainstream. 20 million people in this State. Early response and speed of reaction to the Event will save your life. Make sure you are armed, but don’t be paranoid, don’t cause any trouble or start any problems- just stay “switched on” and be on guard. Keep your personal space safe. People turn into animals when they are subject to fear or chaos, oftentimes resorting to violence for any number of reasons. Look to pre-landfall Hurricane behavior for an example…fighting in stores, robberies, thefts, driving recklessly, etc. This is the one time in my life where I will advocate speeding, but not beyond your capabilities to react suddenly. All eyes in the vehicle need to be either on the Road watching for hazards, clearing lanes for you to pass or using a mobile device to run reconnaissance on traffic ahead as well as plotting course while the GPS still works. 

FL panhandle, I’m headed 98 west to 77 north to 20 west to 331 north to Montgomery then I 65 north to safety. Probably if I can cross the bridges headed to families in Indiana. I’m 3.3 above sea and 1/2 a mile from the beach. I don’t know if this helps. But definitely my plan

80, 60, 27, 441, 98, 301 Fairly good roads, but not interstate. (Even numbered road, East/West. Odd: N/S)

GA:

I live in SE GA close to the FL border. My plan is to head NW to Waycross, then toward Macon of needed.

LA/MS:

Head North and West, maybe to the NW part of the state. Get away from the Mississippi River and the smaller rivers on the Northshore. No one knows how this would affect the Mississippi River, but I have a bad feeling about that.

Evacuating south Louisiana has historically proven to be a very difficult task due to stubborn citizens and slow-moving government officials.
Lake Pontchartrain gets surges from hurricane waters, and would most likely be affected by tsunami waters as well.

Jackson, MS, should be safe.

MD:
If on the Chesapeake region in Maryland you need to high tail north west to at least Fredrick, MD.

For Wash, DC - see below

NC:
BEFORE official EBS alerts go off need to hightail it inland via major traffic corridors before they become parking lots. Goal is to get west of I-95.
hurricane evac plans of reversing all major traffic corridors (like I-40, 795 64/264).
Both Carolinas are problematic due to low country, so many waterways emptying out into ocean. Depending on size of wave and amount of water being pushed, NC's OBX will be like front tackle line but then energy of water moves across the big Albemarle Sound and pushes up all rivers, creeks, etc.

Folks inland living on/near waterways need to factor in rising water and the backwash of debris once water reverses proper course to empty back down east.

NH:

NJ:
just take one of the many roads West toward PA.(195-95-PA turnpike route). Aside from NW Jersey where there are mountains, there's really no other option but to haul ass into PA.

In NJ, the safe counties would be Morris and Sussex in the northwest corner. (30 miles west off the GWB)
If you go into PA, stay away from the Delaware River because the water will come up it.
Keep an eye on traffic patterns. If I get the sense that the general population is starting to flee, I'll stop short of approaching the Delaware because getting stuck in a bottleneck (The Delaware Water Gap) there would be very bad.

NY:
There's the Pocono Mts (Seems a good choice with major hwy to get to it. See NJ for further info), Catskills(seems too close to coast) and Adirondacks (seems too far to try to get to)

PA:
Route 611 in eastern Pennsylvania rides the delaware river. Stay out of that area of travel. Easton PA floods often.
Note: the PA turnpike loosely follows the Appalachian Trail. Means one can leave the TP on foot and haul ass for the

Appalachian Trail (appalachiantrail.org) which is a very high elevation, but does not follow the turnpike. I know there's a hill just north of Lancaster/Manheim area that is 1,125 feet above sea level. Where as the TP near Manheim is about 500 feet above.

(paturnpike.com)
PA turnpike is low all the way to the west of Harrisburg. Be better to go up 81 either into NY or to 80 to go west in PA.

For Lancaster, the Mt. Gretna area is 1,050ft average. Just North of Manheim going to Lebanon.

MA:

RI:

SC:

TX:

If you are on Galveston Island, cross the causeway, take HWY 6 north, exit is very soon after crossing the bridge. This is to avoid Houston. If word gets out, Houston will be hell. Houston is hell during normal times.

VA:
For Wash, DC - see below

VT: Vermont (my home state) is most likely safe. Head toward any of the Ski areas, or Mt. Mansfield if close by

Washington, D.C.:

Here is flood map and elevation finder tools:
[link to www.floodmap.net (secure)]
[link to www.freemaptools.com (secure)]

Here is a topographic map to see where you are and where is the closest high ground:
[link to en-us.topographic-map.com (secure)]

Also, do have or print out paper maps.

Rule: Don't be scared. Be Prepared.
 Quoting: I_Object!

Thanks for this post OP.
I_Object!  (OP)

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
NJ here. Bad advice if you are at least 20 miles inland. Stay home with maximum preps, don't end up a refugee in a FEMA camp.

The tsunami size is being greatly exaggerated. Maximum 80 feet but probably 40 is accurate. Penetration 4 to 6 miles, 10 at worst. Most fringe scenario 20 miles.

If you are 20 miles in, the greatest danger is hordes of displaced people. Do not be one of them.

95 Bridge to PA crosses below Trenton. Bad bad move. The Deleware is tidal all the way to Trenton marsh. Floods occur on the PA side usually, NJ is a high bluff mostly. You do not want to be on the roads in PA near there.

If you are really freaking out in S Jersey, look up Arneys Mt. It's really a hill, but over 200 feet.
 Quoting: Prayandprepare000


Added and made reference should someone have questions for you. I'm just making the compilation of all comments in reference to evac routes. NJ people can argue it out and if there's an agreement on the best plan of action, I'll go ahead and make the change accordingly.
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Deplorable Zenobia

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
It was posted on Mr. P's mega thread and bears dropping here also.

If you're paying attention and want to get ahead of the curve, if you have a 5th wheel, RV, etc move it before you have to evac out of coastal areas. You don't want to be caught in any kind of panic traffic pulling a big load.

The original commenter who posted that advised to move it inland, park it in pep for wintering over.

Same would apply w/ large critters (horses, etc) and if you can make arrgments w/ another farmer/land owner beyond coastal area who will take in your animals, start making those calls now. Better safe than sorry.
And thought struggles against the results, trying to avoid those unpleasant results while keeping on with that way of thinking. That is what I call 'sustained incoherence.' ...David Bohm

“How, O Zenobia, hast thou dared to insult Roman emperors?” ...Aurelian, 44th Emperor of the Roman Empire
I_Object!  (OP)

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
How about just top floors of tall buildings?

Would that work? Would the water knock them down?

in NYC theres plenty in case you cant get out in time.
 Quoting: trthskr


There is supposed to be a minimum of 5 hours and possibly up to 7 or 8 hours to get outta dodge. If that's all there is, then I would find a new building and go high. But I would rather get out of the area altogether if it was me and my family and there was early notification and enough time to do it.
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I_Object!  (OP)

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
Nobody knows for sure what this thing is going to do, hoping it will fizzle out one of these days, but to be prepared, give some thought and make your own decisions ahead of time is a good thing to do. The list is what others have planned and is for reference and to get people thinking just in case. The ultimate plan will be yours to finalize, just do it so you have a plan ready to go.

Really, everyone should have an emergency prep laid out for any type of disaster.
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10/03/2021 04:13 PM

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
Makes me shake my head at folks who live 20-30 miles from the East coast and Gulf coast. If you live in the middle of Florida and hear about a tsunami from La Palma coming towards the coast, you will NOT have time to evacuate. It will hit the coast in five to six hours and I bet it would take that much time to gather some belonging, get into the car, hit the gas station, drive like a bandit towards the west and then turn north only to be in a long parking lot.

Floridians will bear the brunt of a tsunami due to its low level, yet folks love being near the beach. If you have not taken stock of your situation living near water by now, then you need to endure what is coming your way. Leave NOW while there is time. You or the wizards of smart can predict when La Palma will go nuclear, but it WILL happen. Why put yourself and your family in the path of harm? Move now while the prices of housing is high and the roads are not clogged.

I have a brother who lives in south Louisiana and had to teach him about La Palma erupting. He didn't know it was happening even though it has been popping its top for a week. UGH, his lack of critical thinking is beyond belief because he is a book smart individual. He would not know how to evacuate if La Palma blows, but he thinks he will just pack a bag and jump into his SUV and head north. Too bad he doesn't realize how clogged the roads will headed north. I hope he has a good supply of life rafts in the SUV.
Scorched

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
Drive inland to central USA.
Rent a storage unit
Purchase a cooler, cabinet,
Stock it with things that will make your family happy.
Print maps how to get there because we know they will shut down satellites
Only fools would think Americans can be "Spirit Cooked"
tpunk

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10/03/2021 04:15 PM

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
Great idea O.Pbump
Thank You
jlee2027

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
There will be no mega tsunami...that entire model was invalid. stop with the nonsense.
Deplorable Zenobia

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10/03/2021 04:25 PM

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
There will be no mega tsunami...that entire model was invalid. stop with the nonsense.
 Quoting: jlee2027


Us Scots-Irish live by the motto 'hope for the best, prepare for the worst.'

Vast majority of us hoping, praying it will fizzle out (check the live feed to see how that's going right now) or the land will slowly crumble over time w/ no major land slip.

But there is supposedly a contractor working w/ officials in Canary Islands stating elsewhere that he/she is telling folks that among the experts/officials they're thinking there's a 50-50 chance of a land slip.
And thought struggles against the results, trying to avoid those unpleasant results while keeping on with that way of thinking. That is what I call 'sustained incoherence.' ...David Bohm

“How, O Zenobia, hast thou dared to insult Roman emperors?” ...Aurelian, 44th Emperor of the Roman Empire
egads!

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10/03/2021 04:31 PM

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
In the interest of preparedness concerning the cities along the East coast should a Megatsunami actually occur from a LaPalma landslide, where would be some the best places to go to get to high ground in a timely manner.
Here's a compilation of member comments taken from the main Cumbre Vieja volcano thread. I sorted member comments and organized by coastal state information regarding preferential routes, high ground places to go and tips for traveling routes. All coastal states listed. If blank, there were no comments provided for that area.

Hopefully, this list will never be needed.

AL:
In Alabama, considering the coastal areas which lie at a range of around 10-30 feet above sea level and Mobile Bay and delta areas, which are pretty low lying land areas, I’d say if it were possible, try to get to Mt. Cheaha area. It’s about 4-5 hours north of the Gulf Coast area and is around 1200-1500 feet above sea level.
You may not have to drive that far, to get to higher ground, but you’d need to take into consideration all of the rivers in your area and try to get away from those.

If anyone else from Alabama can chime in and give a closer point to get to than Cheaha, that would be great!
I agree with you, it depends on personal tolerance for risk. Dothan has the nuclear power plant, why I didn't include it. Birmingham is plenty safe.

By even the scariest estimates, Mt. Cheaha should be fine. Personally, I think Dothan, or even Atmore, would be far enough inland. I would be heading for Birmingham, elevation about 650 feet.

Pine Mountain near Columbus Ga is 1395 feet. The area is around 922 feet. Or go up 441 to the Appalachians.

Head North and West, maybe to the NW part of the state. Get away from the Mississippi River and the smaller rivers on the Northshore. No one knows how this would affect the Mississippi River, but I have a bad feeling about that.

CT:

DE:
Drive to Lancaster PA or on to Harrisburg if in DE
Those in Lower Slower Delaware will have to drive up the peninsula first.

FL:
NW out of the State. Can cut across the State to the W. Coast very easily and take backroads heading North once gridlock happens. You COULD take 95-N, but it follows the entire Eastern coastline. What if gridlock occurs before you can exit and head West? That’s why my immediate course of action will be to head West first. You need to evacuate the State and assess from somewhere that you KNOW will be safe, like Eastern TN or Western NC. You need to be ready for now panicking aggressive drivers and chaos once it all goes mainstream. 20 million people in this State. Early response and speed of reaction to the Event will save your life. Make sure you are armed, but don’t be paranoid, don’t cause any trouble or start any problems- just stay “switched on” and be on guard. Keep your personal space safe. People turn into animals when they are subject to fear or chaos, oftentimes resorting to violence for any number of reasons. Look to pre-landfall Hurricane behavior for an example…fighting in stores, robberies, thefts, driving recklessly, etc. This is the one time in my life where I will advocate speeding, but not beyond your capabilities to react suddenly. All eyes in the vehicle need to be either on the Road watching for hazards, clearing lanes for you to pass or using a mobile device to run reconnaissance on traffic ahead as well as plotting course while the GPS still works. 

FL panhandle, I’m headed 98 west to 77 north to 20 west to 331 north to Montgomery then I 65 north to safety. Probably if I can cross the bridges headed to families in Indiana. I’m 3.3 above sea and 1/2 a mile from the beach. I don’t know if this helps. But definitely my plan

80, 60, 27, 441, 98, 301 Fairly good roads, but not interstate. (Even numbered road, East/West. Odd: N/S)

GA:

I live in SE GA close to the FL border. My plan is to head NW to Waycross, then toward Macon of needed.

LA/MS:

Head North and West, maybe to the NW part of the state. Get away from the Mississippi River and the smaller rivers on the Northshore. No one knows how this would affect the Mississippi River, but I have a bad feeling about that.

Evacuating south Louisiana has historically proven to be a very difficult task due to stubborn citizens and slow-moving government officials.
Lake Pontchartrain gets surges from hurricane waters, and would most likely be affected by tsunami waters as well.

Jackson, MS, should be safe.

MD:
If on the Chesapeake region in Maryland you need to high tail north west to at least Fredrick, MD.

For Wash, DC - see below

NC:
BEFORE official EBS alerts go off need to hightail it inland via major traffic corridors before they become parking lots. Goal is to get west of I-95.
hurricane evac plans of reversing all major traffic corridors (like I-40, 795 64/264).
Both Carolinas are problematic due to low country, so many waterways emptying out into ocean. Depending on size of wave and amount of water being pushed, NC's OBX will be like front tackle line but then energy of water moves across the big Albemarle Sound and pushes up all rivers, creeks, etc.

Folks inland living on/near waterways need to factor in rising water and the backwash of debris once water reverses proper course to empty back down east.

NH:

NJ:
just take one of the many roads West toward PA.(195-95-PA turnpike route). Aside from NW Jersey where there are mountains, there's really no other option but to haul ass into PA.

In NJ, the safe counties would be Morris and Sussex in the northwest corner. (30 miles west off the GWB)
If you go into PA, stay away from the Delaware River because the water will come up it.
Keep an eye on traffic patterns. If I get the sense that the general population is starting to flee, I'll stop short of approaching the Delaware because getting stuck in a bottleneck (The Delaware Water Gap) there would be very bad.

Note: poster is on this thread if you wish to question this advice further;
NJ here. Bad advice if you are at least 20 miles inland. Stay home with maximum preps, don't end up a refugee in a FEMA camp.

The tsunami size is being greatly exaggerated. Maximum 80 feet but probably 40 is accurate. Penetration 4 to 6 miles, 10 at worst. Most fringe scenario 20 miles.

If you are 20 miles in, the greatest danger is hordes of displaced people. Do not be one of them.

95 Bridge to PA crosses below Trenton. Bad bad move. The Deleware is tidal all the way to Trenton marsh. Floods occur on the PA side usually, NJ is a high bluff mostly. You do not want to be on the roads in PA near there.

If you are really freaking out in S Jersey, look up Arneys Mt. It's really a hill, but over 200 feet.

NY:
There's the Pocono Mts (Seems a good choice with major hwy to get to it. See NJ for further info), Catskills(seems too close to coast) and Adirondacks (seems too far to try to get to)

PA:
Route 611 in eastern Pennsylvania rides the delaware river. Stay out of that area of travel. Easton PA floods often.
Note: the PA turnpike loosely follows the Appalachian Trail. Means one can leave the TP on foot and haul ass for the

Appalachian Trail (appalachiantrail.org) which is a very high elevation, but does not follow the turnpike. I know there's a hill just north of Lancaster/Manheim area that is 1,125 feet above sea level. Where as the TP near Manheim is about 500 feet above.

(paturnpike.com)
PA turnpike is low all the way to the west of Harrisburg. Be better to go up 81 either into NY or to 80 to go west in PA.

For Lancaster, the Mt. Gretna area is 1,050ft average. Just North of Manheim going to Lebanon.

MA:

RI:

SC:

TX:

If you are on Galveston Island, cross the causeway, take HWY 6 north, exit is very soon after crossing the bridge. This is to avoid Houston. If word gets out, Houston will be hell. Houston is hell during normal times.

VA:
For Wash, DC - see below

VT:

Washington, D.C.:

Here is flood map and elevation finder tools:
[link to www.floodmap.net (secure)]
[link to www.freemaptools.com (secure)]

Here is a topographic map to see where you are and where is the closest high ground:
[link to en-us.topographic-map.com (secure)]

Also, do have or print out paper maps.

Rule: Don't be scared. Be Prepared.
 Quoting: I_Object!


bump
The wicked walk on every side, when the vilest men are exalted.
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All who call on the name of the Lord will be saved. Remember it. A simple Save me Lord Jesus will make all the difference when you are facing the wrong side of eternity.
BearTrap

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
Thanks for posting this info.
Louis in Richmond
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10/03/2021 04:43 PM

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
Thank you OP, great info.

I see that with only a fifty [50] meter flood, my home would be underwater.
“You see. No shock. No engulfment. No tearing asunder.

What you feared would come like an explosion is like a whisper.

What you thought was the end is the beginning.” – Rod Serling
eV3y

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10/03/2021 04:49 PM

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
bump

West coast FL here

Have a few different ideas in mind...mostly focusing on an evening escape route because I'd be screwed if anything happens during daylight hours.

Was thinking to zigzag backroads up towards Tallahassee, then cut straight N into GA until I hit some hills. Have friends in TN, and family in OH should it get to that point. Car is already packed & ready, just need to jump in & go.

If we have a min. 6 hr. window, max 9 hr., it gives slightly enough leeway to get somewhat north before it hits E FL, and either goes through everything or swings up around into the Gulf, before hitting the far W side of FL.

If it's too short notice the closest I'd get would be to aim NE towards Gainesville, there are a few but not many spots above 100' to hope for at best.

Been studying this topography app along with matching up roads & drive times to see where to zigzag. Stay safe y'all! rose

[link to en-us.topographic-map.com (secure)]
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
I can't force people to accept the truth, but I can expose them to it.
distinctwords

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
I said this in the main thread... for PA... the Appalachian Trail does not follow the PA turnpike, not even remotely close. Whoever said that is a complete fucking IDIOT. The Appalachian Trail runs NE to SW and the PA turnpike runs E-W. There's only ONE point where the two are close and that's where they intersect.
woowoochic

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
Learn your back roads in case of road blocks and traffic jams. Also have a physical map in addition to your nav system / google maps, etc. Have a plan A, B, C and D.

I'm at 50 ft above sea level, 80 miles inland and within a stones throw of a tidal river so you know my ass has been thinking about this shit a lot. hide
so tell me again why do the protected need to be protected from the unprotected by forcing the unprotected to take the same protection that did not give them the protection in the first place?
The Berean

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
Those in DC should head east. As far east as possible.
Wilson166

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10/03/2021 05:08 PM
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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
How about just top floors of tall buildings?

Would that work? Would the water knock them down?

in NYC theres plenty in case you cant get out in time.
 Quoting: trthskr



Assuming dealing with the Canary Islands isn't an overreaction that's analogous to the way some "experts" have dealt with Covid-19, any tsunami generated probably wouldn't be so huge that areas like NYC would be inundated way beyond what they experienced in 2012 from Hurricane Sandy.
Wilson166
Wilson166

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Re: Cumbre Vieja La Palma Volcano - In the interest of preparedness for East coast cities - Evac info:
Those in DC should head east. As far east as possible.
 Quoting: The Berean


lmao
Wilson166





GLP