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burdock leaf

 
rachel
User ID: 590757
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05/13/2009 05:54 PM
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burdock leaf
i have been doing reasearch on this herb for a while now. i decided to experiment on a man with bad hips. he applyed the leaf and kept on for four hours and repeated.

his limp is gone. i am not surprised, just upset we are so brainwashed that we do not know this simple remedy. it is used for many things and grows wild in pa.

the burdock {aretium} according to the instructions and you will be healthy. Nobody ever will be taken the kidneys away or necessary to go under the dialysis. Your blood presure will increase by 10,e.g. 140/100 will go up to 150/110 next month.It is the congealed blood and the burdock will cure it within a week. It has also curative effects when you suffer from different female problems,a cyst,inflammation after the operation of ovaria or a womb,aches in underbelly. I can cure it in 20 minutes. With no sexuality,suffered from ostheoporosis,when consequences of opration are not usually discussed,the burdock can clear your veins and vessels.

When operation of the spine was carried out two or five times and it did not help and you still have pains and difficulties with your spine,my diagnosis is inflammation of the sciatic nerve,jammed nerve or a strike and I am able to cure it without operation in two visits that makes no more than 1 or 2 hours together. I wash the burdock leaves hitching it against the walls of the tube in two waters,let it dry and enwrap it round the body with elastic bandage.

I am the first all over the world who has cured the liver and the gall bladder. No operation forever. I am the only one on this planet who has cured migraine and women`s difficulties with my magnetism and who is able to cure spine and kinetic organs while one waits.

An amazing invention in the medical field was discovered by healer Mr Anton Hornacek , Stará Turá, Slovakia. Using of a burdock / Arctium lappa A. majus and Artrium tomentosum /. It grows from May to October.



The causes of illnesses:
Most illnesses arise because of excessive perspiration. Inflammations and pains of joints, lumbago, pains in the elbows backbone, locomotive system, women`s diseases, prostate and illnesses of entrails arise because of excessive perspiration. Out of inflammations arise tumours, cancer, heart attack and strokes.
That is why it is very important to wear a vest or a T-shirt because they suck the sweat and avoid the inflammation.

Diagnostics: It is very suitable to wrap up the whole body into burdock leaves at last once a year, fasten with an elastic bandage and leave it working for four hours, during the night the best. Put on the burdock leaves with their facial side to the skin. After four hours take out the leaves gradually and check if the colour of any of them has not changed. If yes, it signalizes the inflammation. If the colour does not change it means there is no inflammation. If the colour changes to brown or black it signalizes the inflammation of a medium intensity. If the colour changes to cinnamon and the burdock leaf is dry and it crumbles, it signalizes a strong inflammation. The change of colour on a burdock leaf can be a spot of a size of 1 cm, or there can be more of them, or the spot can be round the whole leaf.


Treatment:
On the place where change of colour occurred and signalized the inflammation put the burdock leaves /Arctium lappa A. majus or Arctium tomentosum/ and fasten them firmly with an elastic bandage. Let the leaves work for 24 hours the best on the inflammated place. Repeat the procedure until the colour of burdock leaf remains the same and the inflammation is cured using a burdock. The time of treatment of a medium inflammation is 1-2 weeks, when the inflammation is strong 3-4 weeks. During this time avoid the water as much as possible-as hot like warm or cold water speads the inflammation. It is recommended to take a shower maximum twice a week for 3 or 4 minutes.
We make the diagnostics by putting one leaf and when treating the inflammation put the leaves twofold. The burdock leaf suppresses 20-50% of inflammation pain in 24 hours and in a week time it suppresses the pain totally. By curing the inflammation we automatically prolong the length of our life. The healer Mr Hornáček says: "I suppose that by using burdock leaves we can cure even a man in a coma."
Mechanical problems and pains are suppressed by a healer during the personal visit using personal magnetism. People after operation of backbone have no pain after the first visit. The treatment effects the whole locomotive apparatus (elbows, knees, joints, backbone, weakness in legs and hands). Till half an hour he suppresses pains of breasts, ovaries, womb and the point of sexuality (3 cm under the belly button).

Using burdock leaves we can treat cystitis, women`s diseases, womb, breasts, lower abdomen and liver. As mentioned above put the burdock leaves on the place where needed and fasten it with an elastic bandage. Put the leaves on until the colour of the burdock stays green-then the inflammation is treated. On vagina put the burdock leaf wearing knickers.
Using burdock leaves we can treat strokes and psychical problems. As prevention against these illnesses it is very good to take a burdock leaf treatment every spring. It helps to congestion of brain and to settle the blood pressure. During the night put the burdock leaf on your fore head and your head and fasten it with an elastic bandage. Start from your forehead around the whole head with the face uncovered. Repeat the treatment for 7 - 10 days. The healing power of burdock effects through the hair and the head bones.

Using the burdock leaf we can treat heart attacks. Put the burdock leaf on the chest where your heart is and also on the back and fasten firmly with an elastic bandage for four hours or for the whole night. After stroke or heart attack put on the burdock leaves immediately to avoid death. The burdock works as a pump. It draws the coagulated blood. When in need you can use the leaf of symphytum officinale L, in the winter the leaf of cabbage or kale.

Treating the mentally ill children. Children who are born mentally ill have a brain inflated with blood. The damage of brain depends on the amount of time child had been without breathing (1 - 10 minutes). After two weeks of continuous putting the burdock leaf on head the blood from inflated brain disappears and the children recover. The burdock leaves can be used also with adults, their state gets better.


Recipes:
Treatment of Varicose ulcer and "black leg": Wash the burdock leaves under cold water 4 - 5 times. Dry in cool place, put on your leg 4 - 5 times a day, always a new leaf during 1 month (Until it remains green). Then the treatment with Symphytum officinale L starts. Grate the root of symphytum and put the mixture on the wound and also around it. Put a freezer bag on it and fasten with an elastic bandage. Change the mixture twice a day during the period of 3 months. The skin gets lighter.

[link to www.liecitel1.sk]
rachel (OP)
User ID: 590757
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05/13/2009 05:57 PM
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Re: burdock leaf
i was thinking......if it is a antinflamitory it might be good foor cytokine storm?
Anonymous Coward
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05/13/2009 05:59 PM
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Re: burdock leaf
burdock leaves are way cool. they are huge. i collect them and lay them all over between the plants and rows in my garden and they keep weeds from growing.

didn't know about the anti-inflammatory aspect though.
ºEATº

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05/13/2009 06:02 PM
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Re: burdock leaf
Hi Rachel.
Coffee in the morning. Tea in the afternoon.
rachel (OP)
User ID: 590757
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05/13/2009 06:04 PM
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Re: burdock leaf
burdock leaves are way cool. they are huge. i collect them and lay them all over between the plants and rows in my garden and they keep weeds from growing.

didn't know about the anti-inflammatory aspect though.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 678445

arent they cool. a 73 year old man who had been limping for years tryed this and he thinks its a mircale lol.


hi eat
Anonymous Coward
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05/13/2009 06:06 PM
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Re: burdock leaf
Interesting
rachel (OP)
User ID: 590757
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05/13/2009 06:08 PM
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Re: burdock leaf
Hi Rachel.
 Quoting: ºEATº

hi
ºEATº

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05/13/2009 06:08 PM
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Re: burdock leaf
Hi Rachel.

hi
 Quoting: rachel 590757

banana2
Coffee in the morning. Tea in the afternoon.
sunwyn

User ID: 678478
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05/13/2009 06:23 PM
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Re: burdock leaf
Burdock root is used in essiac tea, a tea that is used in cancer treatment

Here's a good link for info on the plant:

[link to www.herbcraft.org]
Three Things From Which Never To Be Moved: One's Oaths, One's Gods, and The Truth
rachel (OP)
User ID: 590757
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05/13/2009 07:31 PM
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Re: burdock leaf
Burdock root is used in essiac tea, a tea that is used in cancer treatment

Here's a good link for info on the plant:

[link to www.herbcraft.org]
 Quoting: sunwyn

i am just flabergasted by this plant lol
nice article,,,,, thanks

Burdock
Arctium lappa, A. minus
Burdock is a very common biennial plant found throughout Michigan. It grows along roadsides, in fields, at the edges of woods, and anywhere the Earth has been disturbed. In its first year, it forms a cluster of large leaves, resembling rhubarb. These grow from a carrot like root that may penetrate over two feet into the ground. It is this root that is most often used as an herbal medicine. After a year of growth, the plant puts forth a branched stalk with smaller leaves and, in the late summer, purple-pink flowers. In autumn, these flowers are replaced by round brown burrs that persist into the winter. The seeds contained in these burrs are also used medicinally. Their use is similar, though the seeds are used for acute disorders (their action is quicker to manifest, but less permanent) while the root is preferred for chronic conditions (it's slower to manifest, but yields more permanent results).

A telling of Burdock's virtues would be long winded indeed, as it has merit in the address of almost any ailment or imbalance. At the same time, it is difficult to describe the medicinal use of the plant concretely, as it is a true tonic, reliable but subtle in effect. I use it frequently in creating herbal blends for people, in various combinations with other plants. What Burdock brings to any formula is nourishment and balance. High in vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals, it both provides nourishment and assists the body in its absorption. It is a restorative tonic par excellence, and helps to improve the functioning of the entire being when taken regularly for a prolonged period. Infrequent or sporadic use is unlikely to yield optimum results. Burdock is a nourishing herbal food; consider it a part of your diet, not a supplement.

Perhaps the archetypal blood purifier, Burdock makes an excellent metabolic tonic, improving the functioning of the liver and kidneys, digestion, lymphatic and endocrine systems. Matthew Wood describes the "metabolic scenario" calling for the use of such a remedy: "the liver, the seat of metabolism, is not burning cleanly enough to remove all catabolic waste products, while the kidneys and skin are overburdened or are themselves incapable of removing these waste products. The lymphatics, which assist all these organs, also enter the picture. They may be pictured as getting slowly congested as, perhaps, a sort of haze of incomplete metabolites float around in the tissues." One can imagine that, in such a state, a person would suffer from a diminished sense of well being - nothing that they could put their finger on, or that could be diagnosed and treated by their family doctor, but that nonetheless prevents them from feeling truly healthy and vibrant. In 19th Century American herbalism, such a state might have been referred to as "scrofula" or "bad blood". Burdock addresses this type of condition by nourishing the liver, which results in an improvement in metabolism, stimulating lymphatic functioning, which brings nourishment to and cleanses cells of metabolic byproducts, and by stimulating the excretion of urine through the kidneys, which aids in the elimination of the wastes stirred up by its other actions. Additionally, I believe that alterative herbs such as Burdock help to "coordinate" the metabolism so that everything is working "in synch". The result is a generalized improvement in the body's metabolic functions, which in turn increases the efficiency by which nutrients are absorbed and energy is utilized. This increased efficiency allows us to more fully experience the vibrancy of well being.

It is this tonic action that makes Burdock such an incredible restorative agent. In any case of wasting disease, Burdock's ability to nourish the body will be of benefit. Its use is associated with a plethora of debilitative diseases: In the treatment of cancer it is one of the four herbs used in the "Essiac" formula, it's an ingredient in the Hoxsey/Trifolium formula, and herbalist Donald Yance states that it exhibits marked anti-tumor activity. I have used it in combination with Dandelion leaf and root, Milk Thistle and Schizandra Berries as a restorative and protective tonic for the liver to aid a man with Hepatitis C, and herbalist Stephen Buhner used a formula containing Burdock to treat his own affliction (he outlines his protocol in his "Herbs for Hepatitis C and the Liver" from Storey Books). There is also evidence to show Burdock's potential merit in treating HIV/AIDS. I would likely include Burdock in any formulas I would create for treating severe degenerative conditions.

One should not assume, however, that one's life need be in peril to make use of Burdock. I was talking with my friend Betty Rinaldi, an herbalist in St. Clair Shores, and we both agreed that Burdock tops our list of all around super-good-for-you herbs; herbs that everybody would do well to use (well… alongside Nettle…). I’m often asked what the best way to take Burdock is; as a tea, a tincture, or to eat it. The answer is to ingest it in every way you can think of. Burdock possesses so many virtues that no one way of taking it can encompass them all. Teas are not better than tinctures and soups are not better than stir frys. Again, think of Burdock as a nourishing herbal food; something you work into your diet and consume regularly, prepared in as many differing manners as you can dream up.

Burdock’s medicinal virtues have always been associated with common manifestations of metabolic imbalance. Particular among these is the treatment of skin diseases, ranging from acne and boils to psoriasis and eczema. The underlying theory behind this use is that if the liver, lymph and kidneys are not effectively detoxifying and excreting toxins, then the body will attempt to cleanse itself through its other organ of elimination: the skin. Whether this elimination takes on the form of septic eruptions such as boils and acne or dry inflammations like psoriasis depends on the constitution of the individual and the nature of the imbalance. The prolonged use of Burdock will, in time, improve the metabolism and help to restore the proper channels and functioning of elimination.

Burdock also exerts a normalizing action on the sebaceous glands, which distribute the oils the keep the skin pliable, and so can be used in cases where the skin is too dry, too oily, or too oily here and too dry there. Physiomedicalist William Cook referred to it as a “sebaceous diaphoretic”, saying, “Besides capillary and sudoriferous glands, the skin contains a large number of sebaceous or oil glands. These give to the surface its natural softness and pliancy. They sometimes become quite deficient in action; and then the skin becomes harsh and chaffy, and no amount of watery sudoresis (sweating) can restore its oily elasticity. A very small class of diaphoretics expend their main influence upon these sebaceous glands. The seeds of Arctium lappa are among the best diffusives in this class; and the roots of Arctium and the bark of Celastrus scandens among the permanents”. By referring to “diffusives” and “permanents”, Cook is saying that the seeds are of great benefit in treating acute flare ups of such conditions, but the root should be used regularly to get to the root of the imbalance.

Burdock leaves bruised or blanched and applied externally as a poultice is a traditional application in bringing boils to a head. The drawing action of Plantain, Peach leaves, and/or Honeysuckle flowers would lend itself well to such a poultice, and aid in treating the infection as well. William Cook stated that the expressed juice of Burdock leaves (a tablespoon three times daily) helps to address boils internally, presumably through some lymphatic action. Burdock leaves have also been blended with egg whites (Culpepper) or butter (Sauer) to ease the pain, prevent infection, and promote the healing of burns. I once had the opportunity to test this, and found that the leaves poulticed with egg whites on a burn quickly relieved the pain, and the injury healed quickly and fully, with no scarring.

Burdock seeds possess a slight "diffusive" quality, producing a "tingly" sensation on the tongue when chewed or taken as an extract; this indicates that some of its virtues are quickly taken up via the nervous system and put to immediate action. In this effect, it is similar to Echinacea, though much milder, and I find that Burdock seed can increase the effectiveness of Echinacea in treating colds and flus, particularly if there are swollen glands or tonsils (probably on account of its lymphatic actions). William Cook also says the seeds can ease the nausea caused by Lobelia.

Burdock is also highly regarded for its action on the urinary tract, being of benefit to kidney and bladder infections, inflammations and kidney stones. Through its diuretic action (which is strongest in the fresh leaves), it will add volume to dark, scanty and/or scalding urine, which is an important sign of renal imbalance that should not be ignored, lest the condition worsen and more serious imbalances manifest. Burdock seeds have often been used as a remedy for kidney stones and urinary calculi. Cook states they "are very serviceable in irritation and aching if the bladder, scalding urine, and urine charged with mucous and gray sediments." Colonial herbalist John Sauer, who wrote one of the first herbals in the "New World", stated that "The seed, taken in one-quint (1/8 ounce) doses every two weeks, will prevent stones in the kidneys and bladder." Queen Anne's Lace Seed would be an excellent accompaniment in such a treatment. Sauer recommends horseback "riding or travel by carriage" after administration, in order to agitate the fluid in the kidneys and facilitate the dissolving of the stones. My understanding is that Burdock seed increases the solvency of the fluid in the kidneys, and that jostling the body will further aid in this process. This is an aspect of treating stones I’ve never seen in contemporary herbals. Horses are hard to come by for many of us (carriages are an even greater rarity), but any vigorous physical activity would likely suffice. For the sedentary, a drive down and old dirt road after a thunderstorm might be able to stand in for a carriage.

Also associated with its diuretic virtues is its traditional usage in treating gout, arthritis and rheumatism, which are often caused by a lack of fluids, or perhaps internal "heat" that "cooks down" fluids and causes the precipitation of solid crystals in the joints, which creates friction, and as a result, inflammation. By increasing the volume of urine excreted, Burdock brings these wastes back into solution and expels them from the body, thereby removing the cause of the inflammation. Nettle would be an excellent accompaniment towards this end.

Burdock has been referred to as a "hormone balancer", acting on the endocrine system by nourishing the pituitary and lessening dramatic fluctuations in hormone levels. I advise the use of Burdock when the need for a metabolic tonic is accompanied by wildly fluctuation moods; a condition unfortunately associated with menstruating women but alive and well (if too oft overlooked) in men, especially when overwork is compounded by lack of exercise and emotional release. This application is especially relevant during stressful transitions in life, be they associated with external stress, metabolic changes, or emotional upheaval. These are often conditions that are dealt with through the use of nervines, but the actions of these herbs will be better manifested if accompanied by the regular use of alterative tonics such as Burdock and Milky Oats. This same combination would prove a very nice base on which to build a restorative tonic for sexual problems and infertility arising from overwork and exhaustion.

Matthew Wood states that Burdock helps to stabilize blood sugar by reducing the amount of sugar picked up in the intestines. Stephen Buhner, in his (extremely cool) Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers, states that the inulin contained in the roots "exert a beneficial effect on normalizing blood sugar levels".

Burdock also has been said to be of value in treating prolapsed of the uterus associated with childbirth. Though I have no firsthand experience with this, a tincture or tea of the root being taken in small frequent doses is ideal, according to Michael Moore. He also notes the use of Burdock seed in treating preeclampsia, water retention during pregnancy accompanied by elevated blood pressure and poor kidney function... I used a recipe with Burdock seed as one of the main ingredients to address this, but to no avail; the preeclampsia on out… c'est la vie.

Running throughout the physical actions brought about by the use of Burdock are the themes of normalization and the restoration of balance. Burdock does not force its virtues upon us; it simply aids us in recovering our own when we lose touch with our well being and fall into imbalance. It understands the importance of slow and subtle resolve and the benefits of gentle but consistent action. In the wild, Burdock grows on disturbed and injured soil, drawing nutrients from deep within the ground to replenish and heal the disturbed earth. It performs this same healing for us, drawing our own medicines from deep within our being to restore the conditions necessary for healing to occur. By recognizing such themes, we can better understand the use of an herb, and when it is indicated as a remedy for ourselves or another. I have not seen Burdock's true virtue more clearly or beautifully captured than by Matthew Wood, who wrote:

"On a psychological level, Burdock helps us deal with our worries about the unknown... which lurk in the dark woods beyond our control. It seizes upon deep complex issues, penetrates to the core and brings up old memories and new answers. It gives us faith to move ahead on our path, despite the unknown problems that might snare us on our way. It helps the person who is afraid become more hardy, while it brings the hardy wanderer back to his original path. It restores vigor and momentum."
Anonymous Coward
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05/13/2009 11:16 PM
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Re: burdock leaf
Thank you for the thread, Rachel.

As a kid whenever stung by nettles, I would take some leaves and rub them vigorously onto the affected area, for immediate relief. Bless you!
mu1ti

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05/14/2009 04:10 AM
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Re: burdock leaf
Yeh, thanks
angel3
"It was curious to think that the sky was the same for everybody, in Eurasia or Eastasia as well as here. And the people under the sky were also very much the same--everywhere, all over the world, hundreds or thousands of millions of people just like this, people ignorant of one another's existence, held apart by walls of hatred and lies, and yet almost exactly the same--people who had never learned to think but were storing up in their hearts and bellies and muscles the power that would one day overturn the world."
- George Orwell, 1984

[link to thesecrettempleofit.blogspot.com]
Anonymous Coward
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05/14/2009 04:12 AM
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Re: burdock leaf
Because the roots of burdock closely resemble those of Deadly nightshade (also known as belladonna or Atropa belladonna), there is a risk that burdock preparations may be contaminated with these potentially dangerous herbs. Be sure to buy products from established companies with good reputations. Do not gather burdock in the wild unless you know what you are doing.
Anonymous Coward
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05/14/2009 08:10 AM
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Re: burdock leaf
I am the first all over the world who has cured the liver and the gall bladder.
 Quoting: rachel 590757


hi rachel. would you have any suggestions that can help the OP of the following thread who has liver cancer?

Thread: MY LOW VITAMIN D- COUNT. (Page 3)
Anonymous Coward
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05/14/2009 08:18 AM
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Re: burdock leaf
I have a killer recipe for burdock. No real medicinal value in it that I know of, but my Italian grandmother used to make it when I was young. Take the burdock stems from the leaves, and use a sharp knife to peel the skins off. Boil the stems for around 8 min. or so. Crack some eggs and stir the yolks.
mix the burdock stems, with egg, making burger sized servings.
Fry until brown. I guarantee you that you will not have enough to go around.
Anonymous Coward
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05/14/2009 08:22 AM
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Re: burdock leaf
So, it's bad if you have high blood pressure?
rachel
User ID: 529732
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05/22/2009 12:11 AM
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Re: burdock leaf
I am the first all over the world who has cured the liver and the gall bladder.


hi rachel. would you have any suggestions that can help the OP of the following thread who has liver cancer?

Thread: MY LOW VITAMIN D- COUNT. (Page 3)
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 441262



hope mabe these help

[link to healthnews.benabraham.com]


[link to www.greatdreams.com]

[link to www.apjohncancerinstitute.org]




[link to www.healingcancernaturally.com]


[link to www.healingcancernaturally.com]
Anonymous Coward
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05/22/2009 12:32 AM
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Thought I'd add a couple more...

[link to www.alternative-cancer-treatments.com]

[link to www.cancertutor.com]
Anonymous Coward
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05/22/2009 01:16 AM
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Re: burdock leaf
Before you really try any herb medicinally, you should research it carefully. Most prescription drugs are actually made of plant derivatives. People unknowingly overdose from herb concoctions when they don't know what they are doing. You can treat many mild illnesses yourself this way, but just be careful and do your homework first.
LakeErieGirl
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06/03/2009 09:44 PM
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Re: burdock leaf
I just moved into a new place before spring.Now that things are growing.. I stand looking into my new backyard which,if left unattended,will be filled with Burdock.I never dreamed that was a GOOD thing!
I don't use spectra-cides,pesticides etc...and I believe in treating ailments naturally;and eating healthily to ward off ailments to begin with.
My question:What can I do with the Burdock leaves only?How do I use them? Specifically. If eaten,how do I prepare them?If applied to a wound or ache,how do I prepare them?As a cleansing tea, how do I prepare them?

All input is appreciated!
rachel
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06/05/2009 10:22 PM
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Re: burdock leaf
I just moved into a new place before spring.Now that things are growing.. I stand looking into my new backyard which,if left unattended,will be filled with Burdock.I never dreamed that was a GOOD thing!
I don't use spectra-cides,pesticides etc...and I believe in treating ailments naturally;and eating healthily to ward off ailments to begin with.
My question:What can I do with the Burdock leaves only?How do I use them? Specifically. If eaten,how do I prepare them?If applied to a wound or ache,how do I prepare them?As a cleansing tea, how do I prepare them?

All input is appreciated!
 Quoting: LakeErieGirl 694333

beautiful site. good luck with them. just picked some, wraped em in paper towels and keep in fridge for tea or salad.im gonna check yotube for more info


[link to www.google.com]

[link to www.google.com]
rachel
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06/05/2009 10:23 PM
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[link to www.google.com]

looking for info bout bl and cytokine storm
rachel
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06/20/2009 12:11 AM
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Re: burdock leaf
just found this finaly what i was looking for!


Wait until the dew is dry in the morning and the sun is shining. Cut the leaves, making sure to use only good quality, clean ones. Bring them home and cut off the rib on the back. I have learned by trial and error to take a large scissors and cut the main rib off as close to the leaf as possible.

If you cut through the leaf, when it dries it splits wide open. You will learn by experimenting. Lay out the leaves to dry, in a warm, dark place. I lay mine all over a double bed in a room where no one sleeps at the moment. Lay them as flat as possible. It takes 4-7 days for the leaves to dry.

When the leaves are fully dry, (make sure they are or they will mold) place them carefully in a plastic tub with a tight lid, about shoe box size. You can use a cardboard shoe box if you wish. Store these until you need them and then rehydrate them using the following method.

Bring water to boil in a large kettle. When the water is boiling turn off the heat. Carefully lower the leaf into the water and let it hydrate. When it turns a nice green, dip it out gently and lay it flat on a sheet of paper towel or Chux pad. I like the green pads that folks use to protect the bed from getting wet.

Fold that pad in half and lay your hydrated leaves on this, side by side. I am speaking of how you would do if you had a large area to cover. Now, spread your B&W salve thickly over the burned area and place a wet leaf over the salve.

This leaf will help to keep in the moisture and fight bacteria and relieve pain. We like to put a sterile ABD pad over the leaf and then wrap the area with rolled gauze. The end result is a neat looking, padded bandage which really protects the burn.

For those of you, still in doubt, there are now, some hospitals in the USA that are allowing us to go into their hospital and dress burns for our people, if the patient needs extra care like IV’s to hydrate them. When you have a severe burn over a large area, you usually need some help to keep you patient from collapsing in shock.

Burns are a severe trauma to the body. But it is really interesting to note that these hospitals, though they do not use the treatment themselves, allow us to treat the patient and are impressed with what is happening.

We found that they were especially impressed with the fact that we could change the dressings without morphine or pain management. This is very important. Pain medication, though sometimes necessary, really slows the body’s ability to make new skin cells. That is why burdock and B&W salve are such a blessing. They make it possible to dress burns without much, or any pain medication.

The doctors and nurses were very interested with the salve and reported that their recent burn seminars on the West Coast had discussed the beneficial use of honey for burns. B&W has honey as one of its main ingredients.

When you study the burdock plant you will discover that it is a mild blood purifier and helps the liver rebuild and is useful in burns. No one says why it is useful in burns. I suspect that this same component that rebuilds cells in the liver, also stimulates cell growth in the wound area. This action would indeed reduce pain.

Whenever you feed and nourish the body you help to silence the pain signals. Pain is a signal that the body is in trouble. If the building blocks that the body needs are in place, the pain signals go away. We find this true whenever we have other wounds or broken bones. When we feed the body what it needs to rebuild the bones, the pain is gone! I have lots of interesting personal stories about this. So, I expect that the same thing occurs in the burn site.

Another interesting note, is that two of our hospitals have allowed caregivers to teach families how to dress other wounds with B&W and burdock. They have treated deep leg wounds and other deep cuts and brush burns with the same method and the same success.

When you go out today, look for burdock to bring home and dry. Do not put it off. Last spring I treated a 3rd degree hand burn without the burdock since it was March and there were none around. I was going to dry some for the next time I needed them, but I neglected to.

This March I had another burn, much deeper and larger to treat, and we had a hard time finding the burdock that we needed. Now I have taken the challenge and I am drying lots of burdock. Someday, someone may need it.

[link to morechristlike.com]

yay im so happy:)
RACHEL
User ID: 529732
United States
06/20/2009 12:21 AM
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Re: burdock leaf
[link to www.sciencebasedmedicine.org]

Amish Home Burn Treatment: B&W Salve and Burdock Leaves
Published by Harriet Hall under Herbs & Supplements
Comments: 18
People in the Amish community have been using “The New Concept in Treating Burns” and their experience is recounted in a little booklet by that title. It is a compilation of articles, testimonials, and letters to the editor of a monthly newspaper Plain Interests, published in Millersburg PA.

The treatment, involving B&W ointment and dressings of scalded burdock leaves, was developed by John Keim, an Amish farmer and natural healer. The Amish have a tradition of taking care of their own, and they try to avoid hospitals whenever possible. In the booklet, they even recommend treating hip fractures at home without surgery. (Which, after all, is what we did before we had hospitals and surgery).

They claim that with the B&W burn treatment:

Painful burns are rendered non-painful.
Healing is faster.
Painful debridement is not necessary.
Skin grafting is not necessary.
Scarring seldom occurs.
Iatrogenic harm from hospitals is avoided.
Patients can be treated at home at much less expense.
According to Keim, with his method it seldom takes more than seven days to get a completely new skin cover on second and third degree burns, and in over two decades he never had an infection. He saw only 2 cases of scarring, and they were minimal. He does not charge for his services.

The ointment and a booklet by John Keim are available on this website. The ointment costs between $1.50 and $3.00 per ounce, depending on the amount purchased.

The ingredients of the B&W ointment are honey, lanolin, olive oil, wheat germ oil, aloe vera gel, wormwood, marshmallow root, comfrey root, white oak bark, lobelia, vegetable glycerin, and beeswax.

I have been unable to find how he decided which ingredients to include and how much of each to use, but I did find this example of his methods of discovery:

When he was in dire need for a remedy to treat the burns on his own son, he had gone to the woods to meditate and seek Divine guidance. In due time, his attention was drawn to some nice, big plantain leaves right before him which he believed would serve as an ideal non-stick barrier between the salve he had applied to his son’s body and the gauze body wrap. It worked, but later, it was discovered that burdock leaves are more effective, although plantain leaves are still used under certain circumstances.

Some of the ingredients (aloe vera, lobelia) – reduce inflammation. Several of them are inert emollients. I’m puzzled as to why comfrey is included, since the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database warns that it should only be used on unbroken skin.

The main ingredient, and probably the active ingredient, is honey. This is nothing new. Honey was recommended for burn treatment in ancient Egyptian papyrus medical texts. There has been a recent resurgence of interest in honey, especially Manuka honey, for which special claims have been made.

There is some research to support honey for burns. One recent study compared honey to conventional treatment for partial thickness burns, and found that the honey-treated burns healed faster with less scarring.

According to this article from the Honey Research Institute (a possibly biased source?)

In the past decade there have been many reports of case studies, experiments using animal models, and randomized controlled clinical trials that provide a large body of very convincing evidence for its effectiveness, and biomedical research that explains how honey produces such good results. As a dressing on wounds, honey provides a moist healing environment, rapidly clears infection, deodorizes, and reduces inflammation, edema, and exudation. Also, it increases the rate of healing by stimulation of angiogenesis, granulation, and epithelialization, making skin grafting unnecessary and giving excellent cosmetic results.

One systematic review found that

For some or all outcomes honey was superior to all these treatments. Time for healing was significantly shorter for honey than all these treatments. The quality of studies was low. CONCLUSION: Confidence in a conclusion that honey is a useful treatment for superficial wounds or burns is low. There is biological plausibility.

A Cochrane review concluded

There is insufficient evidence to determine the effect of honey compared with other treatments for burns or in other acute or chronic wound types. Honey may improve healing times in mild to moderate superficial and partial thickness burns compared with some conventional dressings.

I didn’t find any data on honey for third degree burns, and I found evidence that it is ineffective for leg ulcers.

How does plain honey compare to the B&W mixture? We have absolutely no idea, because the B&W treatment has never been scientifically tested.

It is puzzling that in a booklet touting the B&W treatment, they also mention that many other alternative treatments have worked for them, notably lard-and-flour poultices, bag balm, and olive oil. It is their impression that the B&W ointment works best, but that seems to be based on nothing more than opinion. They also say if burdock leaves are not available, you can use any clean leaves, grass or sprouts, scalding them first to provide moisture.

The treatment is not without side effects. In many of the case histories, patients developed rashes, redness, red pimples, prickliness, and hives, interpreted as reactions to burdock leaves or to the ointment itself, requiring substitution or alternation with lettuce leaves, grape leaves, flaxseed paste, bag balm or other natural products. When reactions and pain occur, they use a remedy called Calm Crème. There seems to be a lot of improvisation: B&W is supposed to work so well, but when it doesn’t they resort to trial and error with pretty much anything that occurs to them.

One of the biggest dangers in burns is infection. Keim tells patients not to worry about fever. He says fever is perfectly normal and part of the healing process but you should watch for a bad smell to detect infection. Fever can be treated with vitamin C powder.

In one testimonial a child was hospitalized and got 8 days of conventional burn treatment, then B&W was used when the child was back at home. Guess which got the credit.

One case I found particularly troubling was that of a 14 year old boy with a leg injury. After 5 days of treatment, “the tissue of the leg broke apart, draining so much that a bed pan was kept under the leg to catch the fluids while redressing.” The dressing had a putrefying odor. The calf muscle was no longer attached to the bone on one side and they kept pushing it back into position. Burdock leaves were “drawing too much fluids” so they were replaced with gauze. On day 12 a mixture of milk of magnesia and brown sugar replaced the B&W to help dry up the wound, also colloidal silver was used. Then B&W was used again and he developed an allergic reaction to it. When the healing “came to a halt,” they put him on a diet of lemonade with maple syrup and cayenne pepper, no food. The healing resumed after 5 days of this.

I think he was a very lucky boy to survive both the wound and the treatment. A healthy body has great healing powers and we tend to forget that even without effective treatment people sometimes get well.

Some of the medical advice in the booklet is irresponsible. One parent claims his doctor told them to treat dehydration by sitting the child in lukewarm water for 30 minutes at a time so the body could absorb water through the skin. Another article claims that “Our bodies breathe through the skin” –a man who fell into vat of paint died because his pores were clogged so he couldn’t absorb enough oxygen through his skin. Don’t add sugar to boiling water, as it decomposes the sugar. “Dehydrated children should never be given plain water as this may make their condition worse.” Give juices instead. You can determine if a patient is responding and has “good vitals” by doing one simple test: verifying that his pupils constrict briskly when you shine a light in his eyes.

The testimonials are impressive and they may be onto something, but there are so many unanswered questions! Is the B&W mixture better than just honey? Does it matter what kind of honey you use and whether it is raw or pasteurized? Are all 12 ingredients necessary and are the amounts optimal? Is there something special about burdock leaves? Is it possible that the ointment or the leaves could introduce bacteria or contaminants into the wounds? (The blanching process would not sterilize the leaves). Can we trust a parent’s assessment that the child really had third degree burns over 20% of the body surface and second degree burns over another 10%? Would the patients who healed without skin grafts really have needed skin grafts with conventional treatment? Was the absence of pain due to the treatment or to the fact that third degree burns destroy the nerve endings and are painless?

The testimonials themselves reveal a real danger: treating burns at home can kill people. The booklet describes a 2 ½ year old girl who was treated at home, became unresponsive and died en route to the hospital. They say she died of shock and explain that shock can be from loss of body fluids but in this case they attributed it to the trauma she had gone through. Another 3 year old died of dehydration during treatment. They explain that if they had known then what they know now about using a water/salt/sugar oral rehydration solution, her death might have been prevented. Maybe. It seems certain that both deaths would have been prevented by prompt conventional burn treatment in a hospital.

The Amish have enlisted the cooperation of doctors who are now allowing them to use the B&W treatment in the hospital under supervision. That’s a step in the right direction, because it will allow for detection of dehydration and infection, will permit professional assessment of burn depth and extent, and hopefully will produce accurate case histories that can be published in peer reviewed journals, a step up from the testimonials of uneducated and scientifically naïve parents. But what is really needed is a simple controlled study comparing conventional burn treatment to the B&W/burdock treatment. Until that is done, all we have is speculation, opinion, and guesswork.
Canuck

User ID: 428454
Canada
06/20/2009 12:27 AM
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Re: burdock leaf
Rachel, what can you suggest to treat dry eye? I have a small dog with this condition and am trying to use natural remedies.

Thanks for any suggestions you can give me.

Canuck
“I shall not commit the fashionable stupidity of regarding everything I cannot explain as fraud.”
CARL JUNG IN 1919

"The power of accurate observation is often called cynicism by those who don't have it." - George Bernard Shaw

Cree proverb:
Only after the last tree has been cut down, only after the last river has been poisoned, only after the last fish has been caught, only then will you find, that money cannot be eaten.

"Mankind's true moral test, its fundamental test (which lies deeply buried from view) consists of its attitude towards those who are at its mercy - animals."
-Milan Kundera, "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" (1984)
^hawk-0^

User ID: 692375
United States
06/20/2009 12:28 AM
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Re: burdock leaf
The bottom of my pan legs were always covered with burdock when I was a kid. Miss those days,.
rachel
User ID: 529732
United States
06/20/2009 12:38 AM
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Re: burdock leaf
Rachel, what can you suggest to treat dry eye? I have a small dog with this condition and am trying to use natural remedies.

Thanks for any suggestions you can give me.

Canuck
 Quoting: Canuck

[link to web-magik.com]

[link to www.herbalhealer.com]

if you click on private membership organization she will send you a free natural medicine catalog. pet section too.

i usualy google words like herbal remedy, like in this cace it would be herbal remedy eye drops for pets. i play with the words and many sites come up.

example:

[link to www.google.com]

then if i see something i want i usualy find it cheaper on ebay:)

hope this helps

ps
i found out plaintain is used for eye wahes so i google "plaintain eyewash for pets"

[link to www.google.com]

if you are looking to make this yourself with weeds outside your home just use word mixes for google.

goodluck
rachel
User ID: 529732
United States
06/20/2009 12:40 AM
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Re: burdock leaf
[link to www.healthsuperstore.com]

wow thats pretty cheap lol
rachel
User ID: 677576
United States
07/23/2010 11:13 AM
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Re: burdock leaf
stock up on this too

dry the leaves

blend some

keep some

lol
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1012587
Canada
07/23/2010 11:19 AM
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Re: burdock leaf
I was just about to plant some burdock in my garden because the root is tasty. I didn't know the leaves had a purpose as well...

"Most illnesses arise because of excessive perspiration. Inflammations and pains of joints, lumbago, pains in the elbows backbone, locomotive system, women`s diseases, prostate and illnesses of entrails arise because of excessive perspiration. Out of inflammations arise tumours, cancer, heart attack and strokes.
That is why it is very important to wear a vest or a T-shirt because they suck the sweat and avoid the inflammation. "


For real though?
rachel
User ID: 736749
United States
05/22/2011 09:54 PM
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Re: burdock leaf
bump





GLP