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Found a multimillion year old ship.

 
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User ID: 1085688
United States
05/01/2011 09:12 PM
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Found a multimillion year old ship.
Being bored today, I went for a motorcycle ride to a local geology spot. This place is called "Sugarloaf Mountain" and it's in SC. I get there and begin investigating this place.

It's a mountain of sand in the Carolina Sand Hills. On top is a layer of sandstone rock. The rock is cemented together with iron. It is very obvious that is what has cemented the sand together.

But what explains a 1,000 ft long, 20ft thick and 200ft wide rock made of rust and sand?

I took my time and carefully examined all the rocks that were around. I found some interesting folds and inclusions and impressions on the rock.

From what I can tell, this rock was a giant boat at one time.

I mean, what if a modern supertanker or cargo ship sank in 200ft of water and sat there for 20 million years? Would there be anything even remotely resembling a boat left? I think not. There would be nothing but a layer of rust on the sea floor sticking the sand together.

In the sand under the rocks there are some sands with odd colors and textures. Surely this is remains of any non iron components of the ship. There are even what appear to be casts of timbers and in one spot I saw what looked like the impression of a key in one of the rocks.

So. To wrap it up, 20 million years ago there was ocean where SC stands today. Something built ships of steel back then and one sank. It sat on the sea bed until there was nothing left but rust. The ocean left and the sands washed away. That left a rain shelter that kept the sand under the rock from washing away and thus leaving a 150ft tall "Mountain" where none are anywhere else.

I wonder what kind of creature will be writing about our ships that have sank in another 20 million years.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1364527
United Kingdom
05/01/2011 09:21 PM
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Re: Found a multimillion year old ship.
Nice story op, but you could have took some photos.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1365341
United States
05/01/2011 09:47 PM
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Re: Found a multimillion year old ship.
interesting concept
ookie  (OP)

User ID: 1085688
United States
05/02/2011 12:29 AM
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Re: Found a multimillion year old ship.
Nice story op, but you could have took some photos.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1364527


I did, but unfortunately a few pictures of rocks won't prove my point.

It's the ONLY outcropping of that rock anywhere around. It's on the highest sedimentary layer, so it's not buried at other places. It's not a anticline so it wasn't pushed up.

Out of thousands of square miles of sea bed, this is the only iron cemented sand stone outcrop. It just happens to be long and kinda straight and narrow. Like a ship would be. Or rusted parts of a ship that have fallen and broken and eroded.

Can you think of a better explanation? It's there, it got there somehow.

The only other way to explain it that this was the very last place that the ocean was before it retreated to where it now. And a small narrow pond was left that filled with bacterial slime for thousands of years so the waste products of that bacteria would cement the sand in that exact spot. Then all the sand and other material eroded away leaving this one outcrop.

Or, an iron meteor landed in this very spot and corroded until there was nothing left. If that was case, where is the evidence of an impact? Anything that size falling out of the sky would leave a crater. A huge one. Several miles across. And the evidence for that crater would still be visible in the surrounding rocks and landscape.

So that leaves us with the sunken ship theory.

Name a better one.





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